MARMIT'S PERORINGA SEIJIN FROM ULTRASEVEN

 

Marmit Peroringa Seijin, 30cm/12

12/13/17- Peroringa Seijin's design isn't quite to my tastes... It's not just the bright red color, but also the body suit's random curls of yellow and streams of dark green, the avian head with odd glittery crest. I like art from the Age of Psychedelia (Peter Max's artwork and the Filmore's art nouveau posters are very cool): It appears to be inspired by those times (and maybe some 4-way windowpane), but something about the design just doesn't do it for me. It's entirely possible that my future toy collection wasn't on their minds when they designed it(?!!)

Nevertheless, it's an excellent episode, written by Akio Jissoji. The fanciful and colorful creature design is a startling contrast to the drab life of a factory worker in industrial Japan of the '60s. The story is solid and well-told with lots of personality and texture, and a perfectly-fitted classical (Schumann?) piano score. I believe that the guys who made the show had artistic sensibilities and we're fortunate that Tsuburaya gave them the freedom to express it.

The obligatory fight scene at the end is odd and impressionistic. Those who expect traditional Judo matches and sliced-off critter parts would likely be left scratching their heads and wondering what happened. In my opinion, the ambiguous ending works well for the episode (even though I do prefer formulaic Judo matches and sliced-off critter parts.).


On to the figure: Regardless of what I feel about the design, this is the funkiest of the four older Marmit figures I've bought (I saved the worst for last!). Granted, Borg Seijin was painted a simple single color, but it wasn't something that I could easily do better. Peroringa's paint ops are sloppy, with smeared paint on the face, and crevice details that look like they were painted with a Q-Tip or a dull Sharpie. There's missing orange on the face, and the red isn't painted-- it's the shiny color of the base plastic. It's as if the guy who painted it didn't like the design either!

You don't buy vinyl "sofubi" figures for their great articulation, and this one goes full-on minimalist with only two swivel joints in the shoulders.

Marmit Peroringa Seijin, 30cm/12

Marmit Peroringa Seijin, 30cm/12

Marmit Peroringa Seijin, 30cm/12

Marmit Peroringa Seijin, 30cm/12

I believe that this completes my mining of old (2009, foot-stamped 2006) Marmit 30cm Ultraseries releases. To be honest, this was a borderline purchase; like I said, the design doesn't appeal to me and even though it's reasonably faithful to the actual suit's design, the actual suit looks like a stylistic and colorful Bullmark-style figure! That's not what I collect.

The fact that this was a rare opportunity to get a discontinued 30cm alien from Ultraseven weighed heavily in its favor, as well as the quality of the episode.

I do like the alien as a character. In human form, its appearance is a child who bonds with the downtrodden main character, Saburo. When it reveals its alien form, it doesn't become an over-the-top maniacal creature; Hell, it even sounds kind of cute. I prefer to believe that it wasn't blown to smithereens by Ultraseven which is why I like the ending that's open to interpretation.

If the design does appeal to you, you can pick one up by setting your time machine controls to 2009, Japan. (If you want to pick up bell bottoms and mescaline, set the controls to 1967, USA.)

Marmit Peroringa Seijin, 30cm/12

 

 

PREV    NEXT
DAIKAIJU INDEX